Hybrid Portraits

Photography Instructions


Introduction

Hello there! There is going to be a lot of information so if you really are interested in having a portrait done, please read this guide. It might get a bit technical so if you know a photographer, best chances they will know what I am talking about. If there are any questions please email me: hello[at]5e11even.com

***I tried to make this page as fast as I can so I did not spell, grammar check or even quality check the code on this page so if there is any questions please email me!


Camera

Any brand DSLR or Mirrorless camera will work (Nikon, Canon, Panasonic, Sony, etc.). Any lens is fine but I prefer primes like 50mm or 35mm or fast lenses like 24-70mm lens. This is so the image is super sharp for editing. Shoot in RAW for better quality images!

Example RAW file types: Canon = .CR2 | Nikon = .NEF | Sony = .TIFF
Consult with your camera's user manual on how to set your camera's file type to RAW.

Note: It is possible to send me just JPG files but I cannot guarantee they will be high quality as RAW files.


Camera Settings

FOR BEST RESULTS USE MANUAL MODE ON YOUR CAMERA AND FOLLOW THESE SETTINGS! This is so you can control the camera better for better quality and sharper images.

Aperture: f5.6 or higher depending on your lens. Some lens like primes and fast lenses have a high depth of field and the lower the number the more depth of field there is. You do not want a great depth of field this for these images.

Exposure/Shutter Speed: This will depend on the lighting situation outside but remember the higher your aperature, the lower your shutter speed will be. You will need to over expsose the sky a little but we'll get into that later.

Example: If your aperture is at f22, your shutter speed might will be around 1/60th depending on how much lighting is at the location.

ISO: 100-200. You could go higher but the lower the better so there is no "noise" in the photos.


Location

Shoot in a location that does not have a lot of background distractions that may show up in the visor. A clear field or an empty lot should be good. If you have a mirrored lens, it will be better if there is nothing around.

Best time for shooting is 11am-3pm depending on your location. Midday sun light gets and even amount of light for both rider and bike. It is possible to shoot from 3-5pm. Make sure both bike and rider is photographed at the same time.

  • Good Location
  • Acceptable Location
  • Bad Location

These images are copyrighted. You may not use them for commercial purposes without written permission.


How to Shoot The Motorcycle

Bike facing left: If you shoot the bike facing left, you will need to shoot at a low angle, pointing upwards so the bike doesn't look too tilted. You might need to also overexpose the sky a little bit to show the bike's "lines". Make sure the front wheel is straight.

Examples:

These images are copyrighted. You may not use them for commercial purposes without written permission.

Bike facing right: If you shoot the bike facing right, you will need to shoot at a higher angle, pointing downwards so the bike doesn't look too tilted. You might need to shoot on light colored asphalt or a sidewalk to show the bike's "lines". Make sure the wheel is straight.

Examples:

These images are copyrighted. You may not use them for commercial purposes without written permission.


How to Shoot The Rider: Male

Gear: Darker the gear the better so the parts of the bike blend well with rider. It is possible to use white or ligher gear but there is no guarantee it will look good. Keep that in mind.

Like the bike, the rider needs to be photographed with a side profile facing the same direction as the bike. A little tilt to the body is ok but not too much! You will need to shoot at a low angle, pointing upwards so the bike doesn't look too tilted. You might need to also overexpose the sky to show the bike's "lines".

Poses can be anything but make sure to keep arms are close to the body as possible. It might feel uncomfortable but it will look better.

Frame shot the from a little below the belt line to get the riding jacket into the frame. Shoot at an upward angle so the photographer does not appear in the visor reflection.

Examples:

These images are copyrighted. You may not use them for commercial purposes without written permission.


How to Shoot The Rider: Female

Gear: Darker the gear the better so the parts of the bike blend well with rider. It is possible to use white or ligher gear but there is no guarantee it will look good. Keep that in mind.

Females poses are a bit more complicated. Poses have to be very distinctive so the female must be either wearing a tight riding jacket or not wearing a riding jacket but rather a a skin tight top. This is very situational as it depends on how you want to be portrayed. The tighter, the more your "body forms" to show your gender. Hair is also a good addition but make sure your hair is easily controlled and not fraying everywhere.

The poses should be feminine in nature but can be anything really just as long as it will fit a good side profile with the bike and show off the female form.

Frame the shot from mid thigh and up. Shoot at an upward angle so the photographer does not appear in the visor reflection.

Examples:

These images are copyrighted. You may not use them for commercial purposes without written permission.


How to Send Files & Quotes

The best way to send files is uploading them to Dropbox, Google Drive or any file hosting service. RAW files can get very big so uploading attachments to your email may not be possible.

Turn around time will depend on my workload and I will let you know if I can use your files once I recieve them.

Cost for work is based upon type of motorcycle, gear the rider is wearing, quality of photos sent as well as other factors. I can only give a quote based on how much work I have to do once I receive files.

Send the shared link to: hello[at]5e11even.com